Hoddle Street massacre killer reveals he regrets murders

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    • Hoddle Street massacre killer has revealed he is remorseful over his actions
    • Julian Knight was 19-years-old when he killed seven people and injured 19
    • The Melbourne massacre happened 30 years ago when Knight shot passing cars 
    • ‘Some hit. Move on’ were the chilling words Knight used to describe the rampage

    Emily Pidgeon For Daily Mail Australia

    The Hoddle Street massacre killer has revealed to his psychologists that he regrets the chaotic killings he was responsible for three decades ago.

    Julian Knight was 19 years old when he took to shooting passing cars on the busy Melbourne street, killing seven people and injuring 19.

    The failed army cadet wrote a letter to his psychologist explaining the chilling moments running through his head while he shot passing cars on August 9, 1987.

    Julian Knight (pictured) has opened up for first time after he killed seven people on Hoddle Street, Melbourne

    Julian Knight (pictured) has opened up for first time after he killed seven people on Hoddle Street, Melbourne

    The 19-years-old shot passing cars on the busy Melbourne street in 1987 and has revealed he is remorseful for his actions

    The 19-years-old shot passing cars on the busy Melbourne street in 1987 and has revealed he is remorseful for his actions

    The 19-years-old shot passing cars on the busy Melbourne street in 1987 and has revealed he is remorseful for his actions

    A letter written by Knight shows the exact moments running through his head after massacre

    A letter written by Knight shows the exact moments running through his head after massacre

    A letter written by Knight shows the exact moments running through his head after massacre

    In documents obtained by Sunday Night, Knight wrote the step-by-step movements he took as he opened fire in Clifton Hill.  

    ‘Ambush now! Confused! Shoot … shoot … shoot … shoot. Don’t stop! This is it!’ Knight wrote in his jail cell at Port Phillip Prison, Victoria.

    ‘So noisy. Chaos. Firing on vehicles on both sides of the street… Some hit. Move on.’

    In Knight’s letter, he wrote of having a vision of soldiers while he opened fire on Hoddle Street who then ‘fell dead and wounded’. 

    Knight’s psychologist Tim Watson-Munro told the program he hadn’t seen a remorseful Knight in 30 years. 

    ‘He’s expressed profound remorse today. I saw a side of him today that I’ve not seen over 30 years,’ Mr Watson-Munro said.  

    ‘And I put it to him again forcefully, ‘Are you sorry? Have you got any idea about the victims and what they’ve been through?’ And he strongly empathises with that.’  

    'He's expressed profound remorse today. I saw a side of him today that I've not seen over 30 years,' Mr Watson-Munro said

    'He's expressed profound remorse today. I saw a side of him today that I've not seen over 30 years,' Mr Watson-Munro said

    ‘He’s expressed profound remorse today. I saw a side of him today that I’ve not seen over 30 years,’ Mr Watson-Munro said

    Knight’s brief army career saw him bullied for six months before he stabbed a senior cadet in the neck at a night club before the massacre. 

    The killer was left with no friends or girlfriend and decided to drown his sorrows at a hotel before turning Hoddle Street into a war zone. 

    Knight has been in jail since the massacre and will not be released unless he is on his death bed.  

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